How Did I Fix Samsung Thin 64gb USATA MLC SSD Hard Drive – Revive From Dead

Months ago I was experimenting with USATA SSD hard drive and use it with my PC for a while. After a few days, I went for a driver update on my system and then System was suddenly frozen. So I had to restart the PC and after that HDD wasn’t recognized by the PC. So I did the almost every trick in the book to get it back to work again, but it was a really dead and nothing could detect that hard drive again. However, I thought it’s a driver update that kills the HDD, but later I found out my power supply is not good as I thought and I had to replace it later.

However a few days ago I had time to look at that SSD Drive again and as expected, it doesn’t show any response when connect to the PC, even BIOS couldn’t detect it. So I assumed it had hardware issues and went to find some resources over the internet. I expected to find datasheet and check it’s for possible faulty units. But unfortunately I couldn’t find datasheet, so I went to check the HDD board without any clue.

First, I checked USATA power unit for getting an idea and I got a low resistance reading for both polarities around 200 ohms and it was odd because of it should be having a one way resistance if it use any of rectifier diodes in the circuit. And I was guessing 200 ohms is acceptable because its drive in only 3.3V so it need lower internal resistance to get more power inside to get to work done. So, according to V=IR it’s draws 15mA in ideal but I had no idea it’s good or bad without any reference.

So I went further on the path for something looks bad and for my luck, I notice something looks like a capacitor, in the middle of path of +3.3V, given me readings of resistor but when the polarity change it’s given me a different reading than first one. So I immediately remove it from the circuit and check it and it’s again given me to the same result.

Since I didn’t have any reference I couldn’t find what that was exactly. So I draw the paths so I can see clearly what it could be.

As it’s clear it could be diode or resistor or inductor or fuse to go DC current through it. Anyway, there is no point of adding a resistor in this place so I could remove resistor from guess list. And also, no point of using inductor here unless frequency filter is needed. Since it’s getting already smoothed DC voltage it could be eliminated from the list. Then there is a possible chance to be it a diode but because of the same reason it doesn’t make any sense. Also adding diode here would add a voltage drop, possibly between 0.7V – 0.3V and it doesn’t seem right. However, it does look like capacitor, but it’s not possible to be a capacitor, so my only guess was it could be some sort of fuse. And it was acting as 1st line defense and my faulty power supply blow it. That all makes perfect sense. The only thing bothering me was, if it was a fuse and it is blow up by higher current it shouldn’t be giving me resistance reading between its terminals.

Anyway, I was out of options and I could not find anything similar to that in other hard drives I had. So I decided to go for fuse and take a risk for already dead SSD Drive. Then I short the paths like if it was a fuse. Then check the internal resistance between GND and +3.3 terminal and make sure nothing shorted in the paths. And then connect SSD Drive to the power and check for unusual heating. At this point I could have tested how much current it draws from the power supply and compare it with before, but I forgot to do that. So I connect SSD HDD to the PC and turn it on. Boom! It worked!

After that, I install windows 10 on the drive, test benchmark and everything was looking good. Unfortunately, I didn’t have any reference about how it was performed before, so I could have compared it. In my test, it was heat up around 400C without any cooling. I’m guessing it’s ok to be heating up without blows up anything.

In summary, this is not universal fixing method for fixing everyone’s SSD hard drives. My point is, you could possibly fix your SSD hard drives by following something similar steps. But you have to be extremely lucky.

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